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What is the Law on Manslaughter in Alaska and what are the Punishments for it?

The criminal offenses like manslaughter and murder fall within the scope of homicide. Also, there are categories within manslaughter and murder as well. Typically, a murder is categorized into 1st-degree and 2nd-degree murder. Manslaughter, on the other hand, is classified into voluntary and involuntary. Yet, these categories may not be exactly the same in all states.

The state of Alaska classifies the lesser severe homicide crimes into criminally negligent homicide and manslaughter.  It is also imperative to point out that the state has distinct statutes if the victim had been an unborn baby. The offense is then categorized into manslaughter of the unborn baby, criminally negligent homicide of the unborn baby, and murder of the unborn baby.

The key distinction between manslaughter and murder is that the former does not pertain to a deliberate intent of killing somebody while the latter does so. In Alaska, the distinction between the 2 charges of manslaughter will be determined on the magnitude of negligence manifested by the defendant to trigger the death of the victim.

Alaska Manslaughter Law

The state has not defined the charge of “vehicular homicide” like several states in the United States have done. As such, all acts, which lead to the death of the other person, are considered as a type of homicide. Plus, these criminal offenses are basically felony charges. If a person is found guilty, he/she may be penalized with a huge fine, a long jail term, or both.

There is a distinction between reckless behavior and being negligent according to the laws of Alaska. Hence, negligent homicide differs from manslaughter. The difference is in term of whether the accused knew of the threat created by his/her conduct.

Ideally, an individual who knew about the risk but overlooked it is considered to be guilty of an act of manslaughter. On the other hand, when a person is not aware of the same can be convicted of negligent homicide.

Manslaughter Law Alaska

Alaska manslaughter law

What does the law prohibit?

An individual may be charged with the offense of manslaughter in Alaska when he/she is engaged in one of the below-listed acts:

  • Helps an individual to commit suicide intentionally
  • Intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly takes the life of another individual under those circumstances that are outside the scope of a 1st-degree or 2nd-degree murder
  • Manufactures or delivers a controlled substance that violates the prevailing drug act and the other person passes away after ingesting that controlled substance.

Manslaughter Punishments in Alaska

The offense is regarded as a felony of type Class A in Alaska. An individual found guilty of manslaughter may have to serve a maximum prison term of 20 years. Plus, if convicted of the Class A felony, the convicted may have to pay a maximum fine of 250,000 USD.

Manslaughter Definition

Criminally negligent homicide in Alaska

The state of Alaska does not define any statute pertaining to involuntary manslaughter. While many other states have defined involuntary manslaughter, Alaska calls the offense criminally negligent homicide, which happens if an individual behaves in a negligent manner leading to the death of someone else.

Typically, criminal negligence can be defined as the failure of using reasonable care while performing a specific act. It occurs if a person takes the life of another person while behaving in a criminally negligent fashion. It is regarded as a felony of type Class B and a person when convicted may have to pay a maximum fine of 100,000 USD and a maximum jail term of 10 years.

The defendant should consult a reputable criminal defense lawyer so that his/her case can be presented in the court effectively.


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