Unlimited Public Records and Court Records Search

Public Records Search

Marriage and Divorce Records, Contact Information, Background Check and More!

Search for anyone in the United States! 100% Confidential! Updated on March 20, 2019
Sensitive Information!
Child Abuse Laws in Maryland: These are the child abuse laws in the state of Maryland

In the state of Maryland, the child abuse statutes make it illegal to physically, emotionally, or sexually abuse minors. Under laws in Maryland, certain third parties and professionals with easy access to children such as teachers and pediatricians are required to report any knowledge or suspicion of abuse to the authorities. Besides, Maryland Child Protective Services coordinates statewide efforts to curb child abuse and states that "reporting child abuse is everyone's responsibility."


Child abuse laws aim to balance the protection of children from serious harm with a parent’s interest in raising and disciplining their children as they see fit.

Sale of a Minor in Maryland
The crime falls under Maryland Statute Subtitle 6. A person who is guilty of sale of a minor in exchange for property, money, or anything of value. If a person is guilty of this crime, then the person faces conviction of a misdemeanor with penalties of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000 for each violation of this section.

Maryland Child Abuse Laws

Sexual Abuse of a Minor in Maryland

The sexual abuse of a minor has two major elements that must be satisfied for an individual to be guilty of the crime. First, the person who commits the crime must be a family member, household member, or a person who has temporary or permanent custody, care, or responsibility for supervising the minor. These are the same requirements for the first element of child abuse as well, with the same definitions for a family member and household member.

Second, the person must cause sexual abuse to the victim, like any act, regardless of whether the victim sustains physical injuries, that involves sexual exploitation or molestation. If a person is found guilty of sexual abuse of a minor, that individual faces a felony conviction with up to 25 years in prison.
 
Neglect of a Minor in Maryland

The crime of neglect of a minor has two elements that must be satisfied for a person to be guilty. First, under Section 3-602.1(b), the person committing the crime must be either:
- A family member who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or marriage.
- A household member
- An individual with permanent or temporary custody, care, or responsibility for supervising the minor
The second element requires the criminal to “neglect” the minor, with neglect defined as the intentional failure to provide the minor with the necessary resources or assistance for the physical needs or mental health of the small, which puts the victim at serious risk of harm to the victim’s physical health, or puts the victim at serious risk of mental injury.
Mental injury is also explicitly defined to mean the significant impairment of the victim’s psychological or psychiatric ability to function.  A person who is guilty of neglect of a minor faces a misdemeanor conviction with up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $5,000.
Maryland Child Abuse Law

First Degree Child Abuse in Maryland

To be guilty of child abuse, three major elements must be satisfied. First, the person committing child abuse must be:
- A family member who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or marriage.
- A household member
- An individual with permanent or temporary custody, care, or responsibility for supervising the minor.
The abuse must result in “severe physical injury” or death. If a person meets these requirements, the person is guilty of the felony of first-degree child abuse. If the child abuse caused the minor’s death, then the person faces the penalties of a felony conviction with up to 40 years in prison. If the child abuse did not result in the death of the minor, then the person faces a felony conviction with up to 25 years in prison.
 
Second Degree Child Abuse in Maryland

The crime has two elements that must be satisfied. First, the person committing the crime must be a family member,  a household member, or an individual with temporary or permanent custody, care, or responsibility for supervising the minor. Second, the person must cause abuse to the minor. An individual who satisfies these two elements is guilty of the felony of second-degree child abuse– punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Search for anyone in the United States! 100% Confidential! Updated on March 20, 2019
Sensitive Information!