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What is the Law on Trespass in Ohio and What are the Punishments for it?

Every American state is an independent political entity that has its geographical system of laws and judicature apart from the federal laws which are applicable throughout the United States of America. The State of Ohio, a Midwestern state from the Great Lakes region of North America, fondly referred to as the Buckeye State, practices its own system of laws and judicature.

In terms of Law on Trespass in Ohio, the industrial state of Ohio has three extensive legislative acts that address criminal trespassing. Each of the three statutes covers particular contexts and they typically disallow moving into or staying in other's property without approval or prior permission. Although criminal trespassing is a misdemeanor according to the State of Ohio's criminal law on trespass, the judgment of conviction could result in imprisonment, fines, and community service work.

Key Provision of Criminal Law on Trespass in the State of Ohio:

Statutes:

Ohio Revised Code Title XXIX. Crimes Procedure § 2911.21, et seq.

Prohibitions:

Criminal Trespass - § 2911.21

It is absolutely illegitimate to:

  • intentionally enter or to stay on other people's *property
  • recklessly enter or to stay on other people's *property even after a notice for access or presence without official authorization
  • fail or refuse to leave (in a negligent manner) even after proper notification by a signboard or through other means put up by the proprietor, or servant or resident, or an agent
Ohio Trespassing Laws

Aggravated Trespass - § 2911.211

It is absolutely illegitimate to:

  • enter or to stay on other people's *property with the intention of perpetrating an infringement of causing physical harm or making someone fright that the wrongdoer will cause physical harm

Criminal Trespass on a Place of Public Amusement - § 2911.23

It is absolutely illegitimate to:

  • intentionally enter or to stay on "entry prohibited" part of *place of public amusement and eventually interrupting the continuity or holding up an event or a performance, even after putting up general public access is prohibited notice

*Place of Public Amusement represents

  • Stadiums
  • Theaters
  • Other places where sporting events, live performances or any other entertainment activities happen for public entertainment

*Property represents

  • Premises or land which includes buildings, structures, any land owned by, operated by, or in the hold of other people or entity, and any individual enclosure, room, or part therefrom.

Punishment for Trespassing in Ohio

Charges and Punishments of Criminal Law on Trespass in the State of Ohio:

A person convicted of Criminal Law on Trespass in the State of Ohio can be subjected to any or all of the following punishments:

Criminal Trespass - § 2911.21

  • Violation of Criminal Trespass (§ 2911.21) statute is generally considered as a fourth-degree misdemeanor which attracts a jail time of up to 30 days and a maximum fine up to $250
  • At the same time, if the offender used off-highway motorcycle (OHM), snowmobile (ski mobile, motor sled, snow scooter, motor sled, or snow machine), or multi-purpose vehicle/multi-utility vehicle, the judicature has provisions to impose fine that is twice the number typically levied for the misdemeanor

Aggravated Trespass - § 2911.211

  • Violation of Aggravated Trespass (§ 2911.211) statute is considered as a first-degree misdemeanor which attracts a jail time of up to 180 days and a maximum fine up to $1,000.

Criminal Trespass on a Place of Public Amusement - § 2911.23

  • Violation of Criminal Trespass on a Place of Public Amusement (§ 2911.23) is considered as a first-degree misdemeanor which attracts a jail time of up to 180 days and a maximum fine up to $1,000
  • Additionally, the court of law may necessitate a wrongdoer to do 30 to 120 hours of monitored community service work

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